Trade talks expected to finalize dealNG SHUIYU,ZHONG NA

China and the United States are expected to come to an agreement soon over trade frictions, analysts said, as the negotiating teams a

re reported to be discussing the wording of an accord and considering applying the brakes to their tariff standoff.

They made the prediction after Chinese and US officials said there had been concrete p

rogress on multiple issues in the latest round of trade talks in Washington.

During the latest talks, held from Thursday to Sunday in Washington, the seventh round since February of last year, th

e two sides focused on the text of an agreement, the Chinese delegation said, according to a Xinhua News Agency report.

The negotiators also had made substantial progress on such specific issues as technology transfers, protection of i

ntellectual property rights, nontariff barriers, the service industry, agriculture and exchange rates, the delegation said.

On the basis of the latest progress, the two sides are expected to continue their work

into the next stage, in accordance with the instructions of the two countries’ top leaders, according to Xinhua.

youhuileyuan.cn

Mine accident leaves 21 dead, 29 hurt in Inner Mongolia

  An accident at a coal mine in Inner Mongolia that claimed 21 lives and injured 29 was c

aused by a brake glitch that forced a vehicle to go out of control and hit a ramp, according to local authorities.

  The accident occurred at about 8:20 am on Saturday at a mining company in North

China’s Inner Mongolia autonomous region, when a vehicle was transporting 50 workers to the mine.

  The cause of the accident is under investigation. All 29 injured were rushed to hospital and were in stable condition.

  Fu Jianhua, vice-minister of emergency management, arrived at Inner Mongolia

at 22:00 pm on Saturday with a team to supervise the rescue and investigation work.

  An emergency center which included four working teams for medical service, security and safety was set up.

qiancengdian.cn

Boeing 767 cargo jetliner crashes near Houston airport

NEW YORK — A Boeing 767 cargo jetliner with three people on board crashed into a bay near Housto

n’s George Bush International Airport on Saturday, said the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

It is unlikely that anybody could have survived, said Brian Hawthorne, sheriff of the Chambers County of the US state of Texas.

Hawthorne told local newspaper Houston Chronicle that police have found human remains at the si

te of the crash and investigators have recovered parts of the plane, the largest at 50 feet (around 15 meters) long.

The twin-engine plane, operated by Atlas Air, was flying from Miami to Houston wh

en it crashed shortly before 12:45 pm local time (1845 GMT), said the FAA, add

ing that radar and radio contact was lost with the aircraft at around 30 miles (48 km) southeast of the airport.

The US National Transportation Safety Board will be in charge of the investigation, it said.

Meanwhile, Atlas Air said the flight was being operated for Amazon.

“Our main priority at this time is caring for those affected and we will ensure we do all

we can to support them now and in the days and weeks to come,” Atlas Air said in a statement.

www.headun.cn

Brexit on the brink of being delayed as Cabinet ministers split

  Brexit could be on the brink of being postponed.

  Three senior UK ministers have issued a warning to Theresa May that Britain’s depa

rture from the European Union should be delayed if there is no breakthrough on her deal in the next few days.

  Writing in the UK’s Daily Mail newspaper, cabinet members Amber Rudd, David Gauke and Greg Clark signaled th

ey would support a vote in Parliament to have the Article 50 process extended in order to prevent Britain leaving the EU without a deal.

  ”If there is no breakthrough in the coming week, the balance of opinion in Parliament is cl

ear — that it would be better to seek to extend Article 50 and delay our date of departure rather than cra

sh out of the European Union on March 29,” the trio wrote in the article published Saturday.

  They added that if a parliamentary compromise is not found soon, there won’t be enou

gh time to agree a deal and pass legislation before March 29, the date when Britain is set to exit the bloc.

  The senior ministers’ warning comes just days after three Conservative lawmakers quit the party over what they called The

resa May’s “disastrous” handling of Brexit, and the Conservative party’s shift to the right. They joined eig

ht former members of the opposition Labour party who quit a few days earlier. The former Labour MPs left their party in p

art over its handling of Brexit, but also the wave of anti-Semitism that has engulfed it.

shlfbe.com

UK Prime Minister Theresa May has repeatedly rejected exte

  Article 50 — the legal process under which an EU member state can leave — and refused to rule out a no-deal Brexit.

  The UK Parliament is due to debate the divorce again on Wednesday when May is expected to update lawmakers on any pr

ogress made in talks with European counterparts on the divisive issue of the Northern Irish backstop.

  This weekend she will meet European Council President Donald Tusk on the margins of

the EU-League of Arab States Summit in the Egyptian Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh.

  Three Conservative MPs have quit Theresa May’s party over Brexit

  By Eliza Mackintosh, CNN

  Updated 1619 GMT (0019 HKT) February 20, 2019

  Ex-Conservative MPs Heidi Allen, second left, Anna Soubry, center, and Sarah W

ollaston, right, arrive for a press conference in Westminster in London on Wednesday.

  Ex-Conservative MPs Heidi Allen, second left, Anna Soubry, center, and Sarah

Wollaston, right, arrive for a press conference in Westminster in London on Wednesday.

  (CNN)Three lawmakers walked out of UK Prime Minister Theresa May’s Conservative party on Wednesday, joini

ng a new group in Parliament that has blown up the British political landscape in less than three days.

  The trio’s dramatic decision to join a group of eight independent MPs, who split fro

m the opposition Labour Party earlier this week, caused consternation at Westminster. They

shlf15.com

Iranians are paying for US sanctions with their health

  Ali only had two hours to save his baby’s life. He careened through traffic and sped along highway

s to an east Tehran government pharmacy. When he saw some 800 people queued outside the fac

ility, he dropped to his knees. Like him, they were waiting to obtain state-funded medications.

  ”I cried and screamed, begging people to let me get through,” Ali — whom we have not fully identified for security reasons — recalls.

  Eventually, he skipped the line and returned with the medicine in time for his one-year-old daughter, Dory, to recover.The incid

ent happened just as Iran’s landmark nuclear deal with six world powers led by the US was being sig

ned in 2015. It was a moment when Iranian President Hassan Rouhani had promised Iranians an easier life, free of me

dicinal and food shortages, and where desperate scenes such as Ali’s outside the pharmacy would become a thing of the past.

  Iran was halting its nuclear program in exchange for international sanctions relief, appearing to turn the pa

ge on a 36-year history of diplomatic and economic

qianpadat.com

Bernd H. Knöller, Riff’s head chef and owner, released a stat

  expressing deep regret over the incident and saying that he is collaborating with authorities to determine what happened.

  ”I have taken the decision to permanently close the restaurant until the cause of what happened ha

s been established and we can reopen with the necessary guarantees for the safety of staff and customers.”

  Riff holds one Michelin star, a prestigious award in the restaurant business.

  ”The owner-chef, who despite being German considers himself Valencian, conju

res up innovative cuisine,” reads the Michelin Guide entry for the restaurant.

  ”This is based around the highest quality, seasonal, local produc

ts to create successful culinary combinations and interesting set menus.”Crippling sanc

tions in Iran have seen its effect in the medical sector. CNN’s Fred Pleitgen reports on medical shortages in Tehran.

qianpadag.com

Iran parades missile during anniversary of US Embassy takeover

  Iran commemorated the 38th anniversary of the US Embassy takeover Saturday with a potent missile display as thousands of de

monstrators gathered in Tehran to mark the event that triggered the hostage crisis and sparked the decades-old rift in US-Iranian relations.

  On November 4, 1979, Iranian student revolutionaries climbed over the walls of the US E

mbassy in Tehran and seized dozens of Americans, holding them hostage for 444 days.

  The former embassy compound is known locally as the “den of espionage,” and protests take place in front of it annually.

  One of Iran’s most powerful missiles, the Qadr, was prominently featured Saturday, along with anti-US and anti-Israel signs and chanting.

  The medium-range missile is liquid-fueled, with a range of 2,000 kilometers (1,243 miles), a

ccording to the semiofficial Fars News agency, which says it can reach as far as Israel.

  ”The new version of Qadr H can be launched from mobile platforms or silos in different positi

ons and can escape missile defense shields due to their radar-evading capability,” Fars reported.

  Trump says Iran violating nuclear agreement, threatens to pull out of deal

  Crowds chanted slogans condemning Washington’s policies toward Iran and shouted “Down With the US.”

  The US-Iranian relationship has grown even more strained in recent months, espec

ially after President Donald Trump publicly renounced the Iran nuclear deal in October, refusing to recer

tify the 2015 multilateral agreement in an effort to initiate tougher and more wide-ranging restrictions on Tehran.

www.qhfaaa.com

The problem is, that new divide doesn’t fall down tradition

party lines — hence the defections from both of the UK’s main parties. And if how you voted on Brexit ultimately dictates how you vote, what do

es that mean in the context of the rest of a political platform?
In the 2017 general election, there was a direct correlation between how a seat vot

ed in the Brexit referendum and how the Conservatives (seen as more pro-Brexit) and Labour (seen as more pro-EU

) performed respectively.
Rob Ford, Professor of Political Science at the University of Manchester and au

thor of the upcoming book Brexitland, believes that this is because Brexit was never really about Brexit. “It’s what we aca

demics call the second ideological dimension. Traditional politics relies on the demonstrable: Do you support free-ma

rket economics or regulation? The second dimension has more to do with instinct: Do you want border control or to

welcome refugees? In this sense, Brexit wasn’t really a question of how do you feel about the EU, rather, do you wa

nt to live in a progressive, global UK, or do you want to retreat and live in a more traditional country?”

ashtvt.com

hey say they were sexually abused by sts, then silence

Lucie was just 16 when she became involved with a Catholic religious community after attending a holiday camp in Switzerland. At the time, she told CNN

,she was “very, very, very alone” and looking for friends and affection.
What she found at first was “really like a family

,” she said. But two years later — by which time she was preparing to become an “oblate,” a lay person affiliated with a rel

igious order — she says a pattern of sexual abuse by a charismatic priest who she considered her spiritual father began.

It took 15 years for Lucie — a pseudonym used at her request to protect her family — to realize that what she says she experienced over several months in the 1990

s was abuse. At the time, just 18 years old, she felt “disgusted” by the physical intimacy she says the priest for

ced on her but also wracked by guilt and powerless to stop him.
“It was like automatic you know. He wan

ted to go to the end — to ejaculation — and I was just like an object for him and I had a feeling he did this a lot of times,” she said.

aishedesao.com